Month: March 2014

March is Colon Cancer Awareness Month and I NEED YOUR HELP!

Cancer is cruel.  It has no conscience. My mother, Carrie, is a health nut who never misses a checkup and won’t even eat a piece of fruit if it isn’t organic.  She isn’t exactly in the common candidate for Colon Cancer, yet she was diagnosed with Stage IV Colon Cancer in March, 2011.  Again, cancer doesn’t follow rules and it doesn’t care who you are. 

must watch/read this week #4: yoga and wildflowers

This is the last–and lightest–of my four suggestions this week. Dreaming of Wildflowers on the Kripalu blog, Thrive   Kripalu’s Thrive blog is one of my very favorite blogs now and I recommend it to everyone, not just yoga lovers. This brief post, which happens to be a video called “Dreaming of Wildflowers” features Kripalu landscaper, Kevin “Moose” Foran’s description of his planned transformation of the Kripalu grounds.  65 years ago, the property was primarily lawn, which needed to be mowed.  Each year since, he has turned a few acres into wildflower meadows, resulting in now only 25 acres that need to be mowed, thereby creating ecosystems and lowering carbon emissions.  He describes the land as an “open canvas.”  Lets all be happy that February is over because the month of March brings something that will make those of us who have been utterly worn out by this winter breathe a sigh of relief: the first day of spring.

working parents

must see this week #3: the many personas of working mothers

Apologies, readers.  I meant to publish this days ago, but I got hit with a really terrible case of good ol’ Influenza and I’ve been in bed for four days.   Enjoy this next recommendation.   Working Mothers by photographer Alice Proujansky   While looking something up at work, I stumbled upon a photography project that blew me away and touched me so much that it made me choke up.  Alice Proujansky has an ongoing project on her site called “Working Mothers.”  Without words, it shows just how many personas are wrapped up into one working mother.  Working mothers have to be powerful and articulate enough to present in meetings, yet flip the switch at any given moment and kiss boo boos, clean vomit, nurse fevers, and buy diapers.  They have to maintain an air of professionalism yet also dash away to private places to hook pumps up to their breasts to nourish their babies. I struggle every single day with trying to understand how a full-time working mother could ever find balance.  I think about …